Waves

An Artform of Precision and Imagination

I am artist specialising in reduction lino cut printmaking.

I create images by applying overlapping layers of transparent ink onto paper using the carved surface of artist-quality linoleum. I begin each new artwork by attempting to work out what it is about my subject matter that inspires me, and to par many details down to the basic elements of form and colour.

I work from a home studio in Kingston, Southern Tasmania, and the local landscapes provide ample inspiration for my artworks. As a biological scientist, I am drawn to living forms and landscapes as subject matter, often focussing on the interaction of light with water surfaces, on land and in the sky.

The art of lino cut printmaking is a process that combines tactile crafting with technical puzzle solving and creative expression and, as such, I have made it my primary artistic medium.  I love both the technical process of image-making and conceptual and aesthetic investigation.

My scientific research background feeds directly in to my approach to printmaking.  Just as science is a search for underlying truth, I have learned that image making is a search for the underlying core of a subject.  Scientific thought requires the ability to sift through data to discern basic significance and pattern. Similarly, I begin each new artwork by attempting to work out what it is about my subject matter that inspires me, and to par many details down to the basic elements of form and colour. This preparation is then translated into the development of my reduction relief prints; I simplify the image and use intricate layering that combines to create my final image.

As a biological scientist, I am drawn to living forms and landscapes as subject matter. I perceive them as dynamic systems, made up of many connected parts, constantly interacting with each other. I mix my colours from a restricted pallet to keep a strong connection between them, using transparent or diluted pigments where possible to allow the layers to influence, and interact with each other. My use of colour reflects the dynamics of the places I aim to represent.

I often choose water in landscape as my subject, and the interaction of light with water surfaces, on land and in the sky. Water, itself colourless and formless, draws its colour from the landscape that surrounds it, and its form from interactions with the factors that make up that landscape: wind, tide, rocks, and the vibrant activities of life. I want the viewer to feel drawn into the scenes I depict, and enjoy the sense of being part of, and connected to, the wider world.